Coffee is better with pulp.

In the early Twentieth Century, one of the most popular forms of escapism was the pulp magazine, so called because of the cheap “pulp” paper on which they were printed.

My stories are inspired by the science fiction and weird fantasy genres. They are intended to be neither a modern update nor a derivative homage to the pulp magazines of yesteryear. Rather, inspired by the enthusiastic creativity and moody ambiance embodied in these publications, they will mix and match various elements of classic fantastic and speculative fiction in ways that I hope you will find exciting and novel.

Think of Page of Pulp as an alternative (or compliment) to your daily news email. Rather than starting your day with the depression and anxiety of current events, why not pour yourself a cup of coffee and take five minutes to enjoy a suspenseful dip into scientific fantasy? The stories are serialized, with each episode and entry building on the last. For now, the entire archive is available for free, but in the future, previous episodes will only be available to paid subscribers.

Episode One: Hollow World

A Martian noir, set in the technological bowels of the Red Planet! Follow Lamont Townsend, newspaperman for the Atlantic Free Press, as an assignment to the colonies of Mars spins quickly out of control. Lamont is following the trail of a mysterious photograph from the first days of the planet’s colonization; but in the neon-drenched caverns of Cerberus city, he soon finds that his own troubled history is about to catch up with him, and it means business. As Lamont struggles to keep ahead of it, he is swept up into a conspiracy beyond even his tortured imagination.

Episode Two: With What Strange Eyes?

Newspaperman Lamont Townsend has the assignment of the century: The only journalist aboard mankind’s first interstellar exploration vessel. When the United Space Ship Westward begins to explore a distant world using information from eons-old Martian survey charts, they learn that the past has ways of coming back to haunt them, even if they’re traveling faster than the speed of light.


Who’s in charge here?

E. Thomas Thomas is a cleverly memorable pseudonym for the sometimes clever and rarely memorable author, Elliot Toman. Speaking. For years, I creatively challenged myself by publishing the daily comic strip Westward. Nowadays, I’m exploring the advantages of more long-form writing, including the opportunity to reimagine the complex and far-reaching story of Westward with a greater level of detail and cohesion.